Wednesday, June 26, 2013

 

South Korean cyberattacks linked to known The 'DarkSeoul' gang,

The 'DarkSeoul' gang has been linked to attacks in South Korea since 2009.

One well-known gang of hackers contributed to cyberattacks on South Korea on Tuesday, which coincided with the 63rd anniversary of the start of the Korean War, according to analysis from Symantec.

The attacks on Tuesday disabled websites, including that of South Korean President Park Guen-hye. North Korea is frequently suspected of having a hand in the attacks, which have coincided with the anniversaries of significant historical events, but definitive attribution is difficult.

Symantec wrote some of the distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks were likely conducted by a group named "DarkSeoul," which has carried out destructive, high-profile campaigns against South Korea and the U.S. for at least four years.

DarkSeoul is also believed to have been behind the March 20 cyberattacks against South Korea that used Jokra. It is a piece of malware designed to overwrite a computer's master boot record, which is the first sector of the computer's hard drive that the computer checks before the operating system is booted. The attacks hit at least three television stations and four banks.

This time around, Symantec wrote that DarkSeoul seeded websites with "Castov," a tampered version of a legitimate program called SimDisk.

SimDisk is a file-sharing and storage application, according to a writeup by Trend Micro. The SimDisk installer was modified to change the website the application uses to receive updates to a malicious one. The same infection technique was also used for another application called Songsari.

"We currently do not have exact details about the method of compromise, but this shows that users also need to be vigilant about the security of the auto-update mechanism of the vendors they choose to trust," wrote Marco Dela Vega, a threats researcher with Trend.

Once it infects a machine, Castov downloads more components, even utilizing the TOR (The Onion Router) network. TOR is a worldwide network of servers that routes Web traffic with a high degree of anonymity through many servers and obscures a computer's real IP (Internet Protocol) address.

"The attacks conducted by the DarkSeoul gang have required intelligence and coordination and in some cases have demonstrated technical sophistication," Symantec wrote.

"Symantec expects the DarkSeoul attacks to continue and, regardless of whether the gang is working on behalf of North Korea or not, the attacks are both politically motivated and have the necessary financial support to continue acts of cybersabotage on organizations in South Korea."

Tags : , , , ,

Share

Social

The idea behind the text.
Respect for the truth is almost the basis of all morality.
Nothing can come from nothing.



Follow

Popular Topics

Read

Well, the way they make shows is, they make one show. That show's called a pilot. Then they show that show to the people who make shows, and on the strength of that one show they decide if they're going to make more shows.

Like you, I used to think the world was this great place where everybody lived by the same standards I did, then some kid with a nail showed me I was living in his world, a world where chaos rules not order, a world where righteousness is not rewarded. That's Cesar's world, and if you're not willing to play by his rules, then you're gonna have to pay the price.

You think water moves fast? You should see ice. It moves like it has a mind. Like it knows it killed the world once and got a taste for murder. After the avalanche, it took us a week to climb out. Now, I don't know exactly when we turned on each other, but I know that seven of us survived the slide... and only five made it out. Now we took an oath, that I'm breaking now. We said we'd say it was the snow that killed the other two, but it wasn't. Nature is lethal but it doesn't hold a candle to man.

You see? It's curious. Ted did figure it out - time travel. And when we get back, we gonna tell everyone. How it's possible, how it's done, what the dangers are. But then why fifty years in the future when the spacecraft encounters a black hole does the computer call it an 'unknown entry event'? Why don't they know? If they don't know, that means we never told anyone. And if we never told anyone it means we never made it back. Hence we die down here. Just as a matter of deductive logic.