Monday, July 22, 2013

 

U.S. Marshals lose track of 2,000 encrypted radios

A newspaper's public records request revealed that the U.S. Marshals Service has lost track of about 2,000 encrypted two-way radios worth millions of dollars.


WASHINGTON — The U.S. Marshals Service has lost track of about 2,000 encrypted two-way radios worth millions of dollars, the Wall Street Journal reported Sunday, citing internal records it had obtained through a public records request.

The paper reported that the problems date back to at least 2011, when the Marshals were deploying new versions of the radios to communicate in the field.

The Wall Street Journal said an internal technology office had warned about the issue, but the problems tracking the equipment persisted.

"It is apparent that negligence and incompetence has resulted in a grievous mismanagement of millions of dollars of USMS property," the paper quoted a 2011 presentation by the agency's Office of Strategic Technology as saying.

"Simply put, the entire system is broken, and drastic measures need to be taken to address the issues. ... The 800-pound elephant in the room needs to finally be acknowledged."

The U.S. Marshals Service serves to protect federal courts and judges. It also administers the witness protection program and tracks down fugitives.

In interviews with the paper, some marshals told the Wall Street Journal they were worried not only about the wasted money, but also about the prospect of criminals getting hold of the radios and using them to gain access to privileged law enforcement activities.

U.S. Marshals Service spokesman Drew Wade confirmed the paper's report late Sunday and said the agency is doing a "complete review" of the radio inventory.

"We believe that this issue is in large part attributable to poor record keeping as a result of an older property management system, as opposed to equipment being lost. Many of the radios at issue had previously been declared obsolete and were being phased out of circulation in favor of newer technology," Wade said.

"The U.S. Marshals Service is not aware of any instances where public safety was jeopardized as a result of this. The USMS is currently in the process of acquiring a new property management system and intends to have it in place for the next fiscal year."

Tags : , , , ,

Share

Social

The idea behind the text.
Respect for the truth is almost the basis of all morality.
Nothing can come from nothing.



Follow

Popular Topics

Read

Well, the way they make shows is, they make one show. That show's called a pilot. Then they show that show to the people who make shows, and on the strength of that one show they decide if they're going to make more shows.

Like you, I used to think the world was this great place where everybody lived by the same standards I did, then some kid with a nail showed me I was living in his world, a world where chaos rules not order, a world where righteousness is not rewarded. That's Cesar's world, and if you're not willing to play by his rules, then you're gonna have to pay the price.

You think water moves fast? You should see ice. It moves like it has a mind. Like it knows it killed the world once and got a taste for murder. After the avalanche, it took us a week to climb out. Now, I don't know exactly when we turned on each other, but I know that seven of us survived the slide... and only five made it out. Now we took an oath, that I'm breaking now. We said we'd say it was the snow that killed the other two, but it wasn't. Nature is lethal but it doesn't hold a candle to man.

You see? It's curious. Ted did figure it out - time travel. And when we get back, we gonna tell everyone. How it's possible, how it's done, what the dangers are. But then why fifty years in the future when the spacecraft encounters a black hole does the computer call it an 'unknown entry event'? Why don't they know? If they don't know, that means we never told anyone. And if we never told anyone it means we never made it back. Hence we die down here. Just as a matter of deductive logic.