Friday, February 28, 2014

 

Ukraine's president said to be in Russia

Yanukovych to hold news conference Friday, report says.



Ukraine's ousted President Viktor Yanukovych went missing in the midst of upheaval in his country, but his whereabouts probably won't be secret for long -- assuming he shows up at his own news conference Friday.

Yanukovych will hold the conference at 5 p.m. Friday in the Russian city of Rostov-on-Don, Russian state news agency Itar-Tass said Thursday.

Ria Novosti, another state news agency, reported that anonymous government sources said Thursday that Yanukovych was in Russia and that Russian authorities accepted his request for security.

The fugitive president issued a statement to Russian news agencies condemning the country's interim government and alleging that recent actions in the Ukrainian Parliament are illegitimate.

Months of anti-government protests reached a bloody climax last week, when street clashes between demonstrators and security forces left more than 80 dead. The protesters' anger was focused on Yanukovych.

Ukrainian authorities issued a warrant for Yanukovych's arrest last week over civilian deaths during the protests.

Meanwhile, lawmakers in Kiev approved opposition leader Arseniy Yatsenyuk of the Batkivschina, or Fatherland, Party as prime minister.

Yanukovych wouldn't be the first controversial figure facing criminal charges to find safe haven in Russia. U.S. National Security Agency whistleblower Edward Snowden has been there since June, having been granted a one-year asylum.

Russia has strong ties to Ukraine that extend beyond the supply lines providing most of the country's natural gas.

Ukraine gained independence in 1991; before that, it had, like Russia, been part of the Soviet Union. More historically, most ethnic Ukrainian territory had been part of the Russian Empire. Russian language is spoken by 24 percent of the population, according to the CIA World Factbook. About 17 percent of the Ukrainian population is ethnic Russian.

During the Soviet era, in 1954, Russia gave Ukraine a region called Crimea, which has since been in the south of Ukraine and is experiencing unrest this week. Dozens of armed men seized the regional government administration building and parliament there Thursday.

Many ethnic Russians still live in Crimea, where support for Russia is strong. Part of Russia's navy is based in Crimea; a base in the city of Sevastopol that has been there for 230 years.

The eastern part of Ukraine is also heavily influenced by Russia in terms of language, culture and business. CNN's Fred Pleitgen reported this week that many pro-Russians there "are very afraid of what might happen next, who are afraid that their culture, their heritage are in danger, who feel that the Russian language -- which has always had a special status here in Ukraine -- might be in danger of becoming marginalized as well."
Tags : , , ,

Share

Social

The idea behind the text.
Respect for the truth is almost the basis of all morality.
Nothing can come from nothing.



Follow

Popular Topics

Read

Well, the way they make shows is, they make one show. That show's called a pilot. Then they show that show to the people who make shows, and on the strength of that one show they decide if they're going to make more shows.

Like you, I used to think the world was this great place where everybody lived by the same standards I did, then some kid with a nail showed me I was living in his world, a world where chaos rules not order, a world where righteousness is not rewarded. That's Cesar's world, and if you're not willing to play by his rules, then you're gonna have to pay the price.

You think water moves fast? You should see ice. It moves like it has a mind. Like it knows it killed the world once and got a taste for murder. After the avalanche, it took us a week to climb out. Now, I don't know exactly when we turned on each other, but I know that seven of us survived the slide... and only five made it out. Now we took an oath, that I'm breaking now. We said we'd say it was the snow that killed the other two, but it wasn't. Nature is lethal but it doesn't hold a candle to man.

You see? It's curious. Ted did figure it out - time travel. And when we get back, we gonna tell everyone. How it's possible, how it's done, what the dangers are. But then why fifty years in the future when the spacecraft encounters a black hole does the computer call it an 'unknown entry event'? Why don't they know? If they don't know, that means we never told anyone. And if we never told anyone it means we never made it back. Hence we die down here. Just as a matter of deductive logic.